Political comment, Profiteering: war & invasion, Syrian history

The Partition of Syria Continues; Charity, Who Needs It? Patronage and Mercy Missions

The Partition of Syria Continues; The Fall of Afrin, March 17th 2018,

The fall of Afrin to the Syrian Brotherhood may well bring sighs of relief to the Turkish populations of Hatay and Gaziantep as the Kurdish force is beaten back. Whether this is the end of that story remains to be seen, as it is far from clear who is in control of the area, Turkey or the Syrian Salafists, or how much support the Syrian Brothers have from the mercenary forces and the West. At present Turkey is said to be attacking the Syrian army itself, leaving the Arabic population between a rock and a hard place.

Though Afrin is unlikely to be part of the new Kurdish territory after the carve up is finalised, there is no doubt the Kurdish will be awarded parts of the North East, whether this will stretch Southward to the oil region, Deir Azzor remains to be seen but is an integral part of the Western agenda. For those who do not understand its geography, North East Syria technically is the territory to the East of the Euphrates from the secular and Arab province of Raqqa.

Raqqa’s colonisation by the Western backed mercenaries was no coincidence and they were promised a Caliphate in return, the process was a useful diversion and the charade was promulgated in the West through discourses of Shi’ah and Sunni. The righteousness of the mission was consolidated in the minds of the thousands of young Sunni Muslims who left their homelands to right the wrong-doings of a constructed minority government. The Salafist’s quest was legitimised further by a historical event that exacerbated the Sunni/Shia schism, the Battle of Siffin, in 657AD.

Eastward and Southward

North East Syria stretches from Raqqa eastward to Qamishli through to the Roman Ain diwar Bridge in the far eastern corner, from where at some points it is possible to wade across the Tigris river into Turkey. The region between Qamishli and Hasaka has a higher density of Kurdish tribes but Deir Azzor to the South is Arabic to the core. I suspect the oil is to be divided between the Syrian government and the western protectorate that will be ambiguously referred to as Kurdistan or Rojeva. Like the North of Iraq it will not be granted autonomy.

The New British Raj, Mercy Missions and Syria

One of my pet projects is to dissuade people from embarking on foreign adventures, an issue, which came to the fore again when a friend visited earlier today. She thought I’d be cross as she brought news of her friend who was  killed in Afrin this morning. I know the young woman too and was angry when I looked at the Guardian article on the computer. There she was with a gun in her hand, wearing a uniform associated with the Kurdish militia she fought with in Syria.

In recent months I’ve written to the local newspaper the ‘Bristol Post’, the Rail and Maritime, RMT, trade Union, two local outlets, Kebele and Hydra Books, both of which claim to be anarchist, and a community newspaper, the ‘Bristol Cable’ on the issue of the Kurdish and the invading of foreign countries. Needless to say I received no replies, which is particularly galling because many of these people are known to me personally. I’ve spent the last eight years coming to terms with the fact that people know nothing about the complexities of the upheaval in Syria and hardly anyone visited it when it was whole.

My friend said her friends and my acquaintances support the Kurdish because they are tribal and romantic and appeal to the bleeding hearts of (vegans and hippies), the bracketed bit are my words entirely, as my friend thought the young woman who was killed was inspirational on many levels. I just wonder why, as so-called anarchists, they not only fail to understand their oppression or how tyrannical the British ruling class is but that they are helping the most oppressive regime in the world to partition Syria.

Both the British anarchists and the Islamists have been duped and played off against one another, it happens time and time again but no-one learns from it. Now another young person has died and regardless how comitted to the Kurdish cause she was both she and her compatriots were in the wrong place at the wrong time, in short the Kurds were duped in their greed. Britain makes lots of promises and that is how it maintains its power, it has always played a double game, it has always blamed others for its crimes and always escapes unscathed, when will people learn?

A political comment I placed on ‘Friends of Syria’ site

Great article, glad you mentioned Muezzim Begg who, as I’ve blogged lots of times on this site, took money from Britain to Syria for the Syrian Brotherhood. His going there was approved by the British govt as well, though its not clear if they provided the funds or the Muslim Association of Britain and Caged Prisoners, the govt just say its complicated.
I’ve been writing to Amnesty about this since 2014 but I never get a reply.
At the moment, in Britain, the BBC is doing an investigation into the ”charity sector” but the content scratches the surface and is skewed towards the ”feel good factor” associated with volunteering..
I believe the number of charities you quote as running in the UK is under-stated. Charitable trusts are important to the British political class as they have been used to erode the public sector since the neo-liberal programme really took off in the early 1980s.
The term is misleading as the trusts generate profit but are subsidised by the public purse. This is more acceptable to the general population than the granting of subsidies to the private sector. An example of this is the NHS, where a system of trusts was introduced in the 1980s to part privatise the service. Mr Blair was later to ”champion” their use in the 1990s and 2000s
It’s a shame the recent revelations focus so much on sex at the cost of politics and economics. The fact that there is so much abuse is deplorable but is not the only thing at stake.
In the early 1980s a friend’s sister went somewhere in Africa to teach people about ”hygiene” only to discover there was no work for her but she was able to stay in post for the duration and was financed by the trust. (sorry but I can’t remember the outfit but it was associated with VSO), very popular with do-gooders at the time.

Patronage

In short charitable trusts are part of the corporate sector and are underpinned by the concept of patronage. The UN General Assembly is no doubt a charitable trust, as are the outfits sponsored by it.
Aid is not a hand out but is given in return for meeting certain conditions. If a country borrows from the World Bank or IMF then it has to rid itself of ”outdated structures” such all those related to welfarism; charities are run in the same way.
They are not in any country for the people ultimately but rather to impose alternative political systems in that country. People need to look into this properly, there’s no excuse now with the internet.
Countries need to be able to control their resources, develop the technologies required to grow food and provide a manufacturing base but most of all wars have to stop.
That has been my mantra for decades.
Bob Geldof is far from glamorous but did distort people’s view of Africa as well as ruining the G8 protest in Edinburgh years after ‘Live Aid’. I do remember hearing a news report in the 1980s about the German and British wings of Oxfam being on different sides in the war in Ethiopia, interesting.
The best bit of Live Aid for me was Bob Dylan talking about the impoverished American farmers, which led to my realisation that America is partly 3rd world. Many of Lenny Henry’s Red Nose projects have worked with local villages but most charity is political and Western patronage.
I hate saying this as a communist but on balance the private sector can be better as it generates work and production even if the conditions and pay is shit, on the whole people prefer to work
To me there is nothing as disconcerting as seeing people in refugee camps rendered aimless as well as helpless, when they really want to be as pro-active as they would be at home.
On the whole charity stinks but Britain loves and it will lcontinue to use it as the bridge between welfarism and privatisation, so it aint going nowhere.

Picking and choosing your causes is dangerous as the process leaves swathes of people in poverty and people do not always make the best decisions. This brings me on to the next bit nicely.

The New British Raj, Mercy Missions

Another one of my pet projects is to dissuade people from embarking on foreign adventures, an issue, which came to the fore again when a friend visited earlier today. She thought I’d be cross as she brought news of her friend who was  killed in Afrin this morning. I know the young woman too and was angry when I looked at the Guardian article on the computer. There she was with a gun in her hand, wearing a uniform associated with the Kurdish militia she fought with in Syria.

In recent months I’ve written to the local newspaper the ‘Bristol Post’, the Rail and Maritime, RMT, trade Union, two local outlets, Kebele and Hydra Books, both of which claim to be anarchist, and a community newspaper, the ‘Bristol Cable’ on the issue of the Kurdish and the invading of foreign countries. Needless to say I received no replies, which is particularly galling because many of these people are known to me personally. I’ve spent the last 8 years coming to terms with the fact that no-one was on my side about Syria but what is worse is that people know nothing about the complexities of the upheaval and refuse to learn.

My friend said her friends and my acquaintances support the Kurdish because they are tribal and romantic and appeal to the bleeding hearts of (vegans and hippies), the bracketed bit are my words entirely, as my friend thought the young woman who was killed was inspirational on many levels. I just wonder why, as so-called anarchists, they not only fail to understand their oppression or how oppressive the British ruling class is but they are helping the most oppressive regime in the world, Britain to colonise parts of Syria.

 

 

 

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