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Tunisia, martial law called a week after the Sousse shootings, photos: nights in the medina, Tunisia says no to ”terrorism”, an anti-war protest & and more

Martial law: a state of emergency?

Martial law is declared in Tunisia eight days after the Sousse shootings. It is reported as a state of emergency despite the fact, that there is no emergency in the country. I was on holiday there, when the incident occurred but fortunately I’d spent the afternoon reading in a sheltered spot on a Carthage beach.

I don’t wish to trivialise the events of that day, the Tunisian authorities are blatantly embarrassed as there are questions to answer. I found out yesterday, that there are usually armed patrols guarding that particular beach. The information came from an acquaintance, who’d stayed at the resort just four months before.

I’m still not sure of the time of the incident but I suspect the lack of security was due to the Ramadan fast. Nevertheless it is the Tunisian authorities, who are responsible for any inquiries and not Britain. I say this because the so called ”state of emergency” is no doubt at the behest of Britain.

”Great” Britain

I had travelled to Enfiddha on Monarch Airlines to save money and took a bus from there to Tunis capital. When I returned to Gatwick on the night of July 3rd, we were asked by the stewards to remain seated for an announcement. Passengers then were asked to surrender any personal media footage of the shootings to some waiting police.

It was a bit of a shock as I felt all evidence should have been surrendered a week before to the Tunisian police. When I left the plane there were around seven men and women in plain clothes, who looked distinctly like MI5, scrutinising passengers as they disembarked. Martial law was declared the following day.

Recently I’ve noticed the usual platitudes in the media as journalists and ”human rights” activists beseech the Tunisian government to uphold the country’s newly gained freedoms and not ”overstep the mark”, during the clamp down. Luckily Bizerte festival is over but all other public gatherings are likely to be cancelled this summer.

Its an irony, that it is the 10th anniversary of July 7th, when bombs went off in London. As I remember there was no ”state of emergency” as this would threaten the British economy; interesting as the Tunisian economy is going to be severely affected by British inspired martial law.

 Protesting against terrorism

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These photos show a demonstration, which took place in Tunis capital, the evening of the Sousse shootings. It was held outside a civic centre in Bourghiba Avenue but would not be possible now as the right to gather together is prohibited.

Incidentally people asked me to display these photographs.

A Tunisian style anti-war protest

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The above is a group of young people protesting about war, their mantra was ”protect not punish”; they issued stickers saying as much. I’m not sure if the event was in direct response to the Sousse shootings as there are often celebrations in the medina following the breaking of the fast.

Tunis Capital & Bizerte

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Home in on some of the photos and you’ll see the starlings, which amass over the capital at dawn and dusk. The reason the capital’s main street is deserted is, that it is time for evening prayer.

Other photos are of the Bizerte canal, coastline and carriages at the week long festival, which also would be prohibited now.

A photo of Enfidha museum my one and only.

Enfiddha is a lovely little town, that has not benefited, economically from the construction of the airport just five kilometers out of town. To compensate I bought a lovely green Kaftan from a small fashion shop run by two extremely helpful young women.

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